Curating Content To Support Learning About Humanity's Transition

Posts tagged with:  Blogs

By: The Posts Author | Posted on: 30 Sep 21

What gives you hope for the future? That’s what we’re asking communities around the world. Introducing A New Community Engagement Demo SenseMaker® Collector   Our new SenseMaker® collector focuses on what’s important to communities and what gives them hope, as part of The Cynefin Centre’s Citizen Engagement & Democratic Innovation programme. The collector demonstrates how SenseMaker® can be used to gather stories about what it’s like to live in local communities. People are invited to share a specific story in their community and answer a few questions about it. Open engagement with citizens and community members such as this gives …

What gives you hope for the future? Read More »

What gives you hope for the future? That’s what we’re asking communities around the world. Introducing A New Community Engagement Demo SenseMaker® Collector   Our new SenseMaker® collector focuses on what’s important to communities and what gives them hope, as part of The Cynefin Centre’s Citizen Engagement & Democratic Innovation programme. The collector demonstrates how SenseMaker® can be used to …

What gives you hope for the future? Read More »


By: The Posts Author | Posted on: 23 Aug 21

If you’ve been following us for the last few years, you’ll know we’ve been developing our Citizen Engagement & Democratic Innovation programme. So it’s a well established hive of activity and expertise. Now The Cynefin Company is proud to announce we’re launching a white paper to explain the theory and thinking that underpins the programme. So right here, right now, we’re going to give you a little taster of what’s in store.    Or if you want to dive straight in, you can download the white paper here.    Our vision In this white paper, we outline our ecosystem of …

We’re launching a Citizen Engagement & Democratic Innovation Programme White Paper Read More »

If you’ve been following us for the last few years, you’ll know we’ve been developing our Citizen Engagement & Democratic Innovation programme. So it’s a well established hive of activity and expertise. Now The Cynefin Company is proud to announce we’re launching a white paper to explain the theory and thinking that underpins the programme. So right here, right now, …

We’re launching a Citizen Engagement & Democratic Innovation Programme White Paper Read More »


By: The Posts Author | Posted on: 7 Jun 21

I’m going to assume that everyone who frequents this blog and is a regular reader of Dave’s work is very familiar with general concepts of evolution, both as a biological fact and as a metaphor. In the Cynefin framework, evolution appears most prominently in exaptive practice, associated with the complex domain. Exaptation in that context is defined as radical repurposing and it is key to how innovation often happens in complexity. The term exaptation was proposed as an additional process to adaptation by the evolutionary biologist (and a personal favourite) Stephen Jay Gould, most famously outlined in a 1982 essay …

How the elephant got his trunk: what evolution can teach us about complexity Read More »

I’m going to assume that everyone who frequents this blog and is a regular reader of Dave’s work is very familiar with general concepts of evolution, both as a biological fact and as a metaphor. In the Cynefin framework, evolution appears most prominently in exaptive practice, associated with the complex domain. Exaptation in that context is defined as radical repurposing …

How the elephant got his trunk: what evolution can teach us about complexity Read More »


By: The Posts Author | Posted on: 7 Jun 21

Anthro complexity I’m going to assume that everyone who frequents this blog and is a regular reader of Dave’s work is very familiar with general concepts of evolution, both as a biological fact and as a metaphor. In the Cynefin framework, evolution appears most prominently in exaptive practice, associated with the complex domain. Exaptation in that context is defined as radical repurposing and it is key to how innovation often happens in complexity. The term exaptation was proposed as an additional process to adaptation by the evolutionary biologist (and a personal favourite) Stephen Jay Gould, most famously outlined in a …

How the elephant got his trunk: what evolution can teach us about complexity Read More »

Anthro complexity I’m going to assume that everyone who frequents this blog and is a regular reader of Dave’s work is very familiar with general concepts of evolution, both as a biological fact and as a metaphor. In the Cynefin framework, evolution appears most prominently in exaptive practice, associated with the complex domain. Exaptation in that context is defined as …

How the elephant got his trunk: what evolution can teach us about complexity Read More »


By: The Posts Author | Posted on: 8 Apr 21

After a couple of weeks of hiatus (early spring is definitely Bank Holiday season here in Cyprus), this blog series returns for its final look back at the Acorn Study. To extend the metaphor, it is time to look at the forest floor and examine the new growth. Before we do that, I would like to add a reminder that this study includes a far-from-representative sample and cannot draw conclusions with global applicability. It is fair to say that most of the participants are from what psychology calls WEIRD societies (western, educated, industrialised, rich, and democratic). Still, it is relevant …

Looking back at the Acorn Study; Part 9: Seedlings Read More »

After a couple of weeks of hiatus (early spring is definitely Bank Holiday season here in Cyprus), this blog series returns for its final look back at the Acorn Study. To extend the metaphor, it is time to look at the forest floor and examine the new growth. Before we do that, I would like to add a reminder that …

Looking back at the Acorn Study; Part 9: Seedlings Read More »


By: The Posts Author | Posted on: 18 Mar 21

Picking up right where we left things, let’s dive straight into more of the patterns. It is a commonly-accepted stereotype that those of us with access to social media distractions spent most of the pandemic doomscrolling. There might be an element of truth to that (I know that I downloaded two new social media platforms within the last year). Still, when it came to knowledge or awareness, we see that media, social or traditional, was not the primary source in participants’ stories. Instead, there has been movement towards the central space of combining multiple sources of knowledge and tempering what …

Looking back at the Acorn Study; Part 8.2: And then COVID happened Read More »

Picking up right where we left things, let’s dive straight into more of the patterns. It is a commonly-accepted stereotype that those of us with access to social media distractions spent most of the pandemic doomscrolling. There might be an element of truth to that (I know that I downloaded two new social media platforms within the last year). Still, …

Looking back at the Acorn Study; Part 8.2: And then COVID happened Read More »


By: The Posts Author | Posted on: 11 Mar 21

The Acorn Study began in the autumn of 2019. As often happens, most stories were collected in its early days in the flurry of sharing that followed its release. As the initial flood stopped, stories kept coming in, slowly but steadily, until the collection was closed down at the end of 2020. In between those two dates, something changed. The theoretical possibility of a pandemic arriving sooner or later became a reality. Even though COVID-19 wasn’t the Black Death in terms of mortality, it was more than enough to shut many of us in our homes, make more of us …

Looking back at the Acorn Study; Part 8.1: And then COVID happened Read More »

The Acorn Study began in the autumn of 2019. As often happens, most stories were collected in its early days in the flurry of sharing that followed its release. As the initial flood stopped, stories kept coming in, slowly but steadily, until the collection was closed down at the end of 2020. In between those two dates, something changed. The …

Looking back at the Acorn Study; Part 8.1: And then COVID happened Read More »


By: The Posts Author | Posted on: 4 Mar 21

In 2018, Jem Bendell, a sustainability leadership professor, wrote a paper that took the possibility of near-term societal collapse due to climate change extremely seriously (you can read the whole thing here). I would like to spend a little bit of time on this paper because it was the theoretical basis for one of the multiple-choice questions (and, therefore, analysis filters) that participants confronted in the Acorn Study. The paper set out four key aspects of what the author calls the Deep Adaptation agenda: resilience, relinquishment, restoration, and reconciliation. One of the paper’s critical discussions and preoccupations is discussing the serious …

Looking back at the Acorn Study; Part 7: Hope, loss, and sacrifice Read More »

In 2018, Jem Bendell, a sustainability leadership professor, wrote a paper that took the possibility of near-term societal collapse due to climate change extremely seriously (you can read the whole thing here). I would like to spend a little bit of time on this paper because it was the theoretical basis for one of the multiple-choice questions (and, therefore, analysis filters) …

Looking back at the Acorn Study; Part 7: Hope, loss, and sacrifice Read More »


By: The Posts Author | Posted on: 25 Feb 21

As always, let’s start with one of the high-level patterns in our collection: the sources of knowledge or awareness in the actions or stories shared. The largest cluster of stories is at the top of the triad, showing that in most stories, knowledge came from social or mass media, with a secondary group at the centre of the triad, indicating a combination of all three sources of knowledge. There is a scatter of stories all over the rest of the triad. Notably, there are fewer indications that experts are a principal or primary source of information and awareness in stories. …

Looking back at the Acorn Study; Part 6: Knowledge and information – always needing more? Read More »

As always, let’s start with one of the high-level patterns in our collection: the sources of knowledge or awareness in the actions or stories shared. The largest cluster of stories is at the top of the triad, showing that in most stories, knowledge came from social or mass media, with a secondary group at the centre of the triad, indicating …

Looking back at the Acorn Study; Part 6: Knowledge and information – always needing more? Read More »


By: The Posts Author | Posted on: 18 Feb 21

This week we are looking at the dimension of time. Time is a central concept in all kinds of contexts, and it is an anchor that is often used when people interpret their stories. The core ideas of past, present, and future can take on different labels and nuances depending on the specific nature and context of a collection, and they do just that here as well. Moreover, by positioning the story in relationship with all three of these we subvert a little bit the linear approach to time, at the same time as using it as a heuristic (a …

Looking back at the Acorn Study; Part 5: Looking backwards, looking forwards Read More »

This week we are looking at the dimension of time. Time is a central concept in all kinds of contexts, and it is an anchor that is often used when people interpret their stories. The core ideas of past, present, and future can take on different labels and nuances depending on the specific nature and context of a collection, and …

Looking back at the Acorn Study; Part 5: Looking backwards, looking forwards Read More »


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