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Posts tagged with:  hierarchy

By: The Posts Author | Posted on: 9 Jun 22

By Joost Minnaar and originally published at corporate-rebels.com Both Zappos.com & Bol.com are online retailers. Around 2015, each launched transformation journeys inspired by Holacracy. While they share similarities, the journeys were quite different. What do these pioneers teach us, five years down the road? The similarities Zappos is American and Bol is Dutch, but the similarities are striking: Both are e-commerce players Both were founded in 1999 Both are owned by larger retail organizations (Zappos by Amazon, Bol by Ahold/Delhaize) Both generate annual revenues of $2.5B to $3.0B Both have between 1,500 and 2,000 staff Both started a transformation around …

Two Large-Scale Holacracy Experiments: Zappos.com vs. Bol.com Read More »

By Joost Minnaar and originally published at corporate-rebels.com Both Zappos.com & Bol.com are online retailers. Around 2015, each launched transformation journeys inspired by Holacracy. While they share similarities, the journeys were quite different. What do these pioneers teach us, five years down the road? The similarities Zappos is American and Bol is Dutch, but the similarities are striking: Both are …

Two Large-Scale Holacracy Experiments: Zappos.com vs. Bol.com Read More »


By: The Posts Author | Posted on: 14 Apr 22

By Joost Minnaar and originally published at corporate-rebels.com Around the year 1900, rats were a huge problem in Hanoi, Vietnam — known then as French Indochina. The colonial government came up with a new public policy to solve the problem: a citywide rat bounty program. In an effort to encourage the local entrepreneurial spirit, and to provide locals with a new source of income, the government started to pay citizens to kill rats. But since the colonial rulers didn’t want to be bothered with the task of rat corpse disposal, they decided to pay a bounty of one cent to …

The Cobra Effect: Never Invent Rules from the Ivory Tower Read More »

By Joost Minnaar and originally published at corporate-rebels.com Around the year 1900, rats were a huge problem in Hanoi, Vietnam — known then as French Indochina. The colonial government came up with a new public policy to solve the problem: a citywide rat bounty program. In an effort to encourage the local entrepreneurial spirit, and to provide locals with a …

The Cobra Effect: Never Invent Rules from the Ivory Tower Read More »


By: The Posts Author | Posted on: 15 Feb 22

By Mark Eddleston and originally published on newwaysofworking Traditional decision-making 🧍‍♂️ In most organisations, centralised authority (such as the senior leadership team) holds much of the power. A few people at the top make most decisions, plus some lucky middle managers, while everyone else does as they are told. Employees need approval before they can do stuff that they haven’t been told to do. A few things may be approved here and there but, typically, lots of people feel frustrated and disempowered. Decisions are too often made by people who are far away from the customer or information, while promising …

Do Try This at Work #6: The Advice Process Read More »

By Mark Eddleston and originally published on newwaysofworking Traditional decision-making 🧍‍♂️ In most organisations, centralised authority (such as the senior leadership team) holds much of the power. A few people at the top make most decisions, plus some lucky middle managers, while everyone else does as they are told. Employees need approval before they can do stuff that they haven’t …

Do Try This at Work #6: The Advice Process Read More »


By: The Posts Author | Posted on: 21 Jan 22

By Joost Minnaar and originally posted as a single article at corporate-rebels.com This is Part 2 of a 2-part article. Read Part 1 here. Implementing a framework of key practices Olivier recognized that accountability was essential for him to trust his people fully. Together, they created a framework of key practices that enabled employees to self-manage, actively listen to each other, collaborate on important decisions, and resolve conflicts with themselves and clients. Thanks to the research done by the team at the Technical University of Madrid, we can distill the five key practices that made the second transfer of authority …

Reinventing Management: The Bold Transformation of A Peruvian Laundry Service – Part 2 Read More »

By Joost Minnaar and originally posted as a single article at corporate-rebels.com This is Part 2 of a 2-part article. Read Part 1 here. Implementing a framework of key practices Olivier recognized that accountability was essential for him to trust his people fully. Together, they created a framework of key practices that enabled employees to self-manage, actively listen to each …

Reinventing Management: The Bold Transformation of A Peruvian Laundry Service – Part 2 Read More »


By: The Posts Author | Posted on: 15 Dec 21

By  Joost Minnaar and originally published at Corporate Rebels. Roughly five years ago, we loaded into a campervan and drove throughout California to visit companies like Google, Morning Star and Patagonia. We wanted to learn everything about their unique ways of doing things. While most of this trip occurred in California, we also wound up making a side-trek into Nevada to visit Zappos at their headquarters in Las Vegas. It was an interesting experience—they had been working with Holacracy for some time, and employees’ opinions about that organizational experiment were a somewhat mixed bag. Some liked it; most were skeptical. …

Zappos’ Evolution: From Holacracy to Market-Based Dynamics Read More »

By  Joost Minnaar and originally published at Corporate Rebels. Roughly five years ago, we loaded into a campervan and drove throughout California to visit companies like Google, Morning Star and Patagonia. We wanted to learn everything about their unique ways of doing things. While most of this trip occurred in California, we also wound up making a side-trek into Nevada …

Zappos’ Evolution: From Holacracy to Market-Based Dynamics Read More »


By: The Posts Author | Posted on: 9 Dec 21

By Joost Minnaar and originally published on Corporate Rebels Imagine a company that is future-proof and ready for the world after the COVID-19 pandemic. Imagine a company that is dynamic, risk-taking, adventurous, rapidly moving, entrepreneurial, sharing profits, flexible, and growing fast. This all sounds like a startup, right? Not necessarily. It can also be the characteristics of a subsidiary of a larger company. At least, that is what the case of Haier Germany shows us. Making Haier Germany future-proof all started with the Rendanheyi model. Never heard of the Rendanheyi model? Please first check the animation below. Rendanheyi Why is …

Haier Germany: How to Future-Proof Your Company Read More »

By Joost Minnaar and originally published on Corporate Rebels Imagine a company that is future-proof and ready for the world after the COVID-19 pandemic. Imagine a company that is dynamic, risk-taking, adventurous, rapidly moving, entrepreneurial, sharing profits, flexible, and growing fast. This all sounds like a startup, right? Not necessarily. It can also be the characteristics of a subsidiary of …

Haier Germany: How to Future-Proof Your Company Read More »


By: The Posts Author | Posted on: 22 Oct 21

By Christiane Seuhs-Schoeller and as a single article originally published at christianesplace.com This is Part One of a two-part article. Part Two is here. Introduction: Setting the context for power in self-organization For over half a century, we have seen a growing movement dedicated to finding new ways to organize work. People have innovated many alternatives to the management hierarchy that emerged out of the industrial revolution and became a globally dominant organizational model. One thing seems to be clear; the power hierarchy has run its course. The complex circumstances of the 21st century call for  a different way for …

Is Distributed Power a Myth? – Part One: Distributed Authority Leaves Power in Shadow Read More »

By Christiane Seuhs-Schoeller and as a single article originally published at christianesplace.com This is Part One of a two-part article. Part Two is here. Introduction: Setting the context for power in self-organization For over half a century, we have seen a growing movement dedicated to finding new ways to organize work. People have innovated many alternatives to the management hierarchy …

Is Distributed Power a Myth? – Part One: Distributed Authority Leaves Power in Shadow Read More »


By: The Posts Author | Posted on: 9 Sep 21

By Joana Breidenbach and originally published by TEDxBerlinSalon Introduction by EE Magazine: “New work needs inner work” – Joana Breidenbach proposes a healthy balance between Belonging and Becoming. To be effective, a leader will be: Grounded – know themselves well Able to connect and empathise at a deep level Open to change through having a range of perspectives Together, these abilities create an open culture where healthy feedback is the norm, intuition and connection are fostered and innovation flourishes. Hierarchy is fluid and changing and based on competency rather than authority. This approach can be expensive of time and energy …

New Work Needs Inner Work Read More »

By Joana Breidenbach and originally published by TEDxBerlinSalon Introduction by EE Magazine: “New work needs inner work” – Joana Breidenbach proposes a healthy balance between Belonging and Becoming. To be effective, a leader will be: Grounded – know themselves well Able to connect and empathise at a deep level Open to change through having a range of perspectives Together, these …

New Work Needs Inner Work Read More »


By: The Posts Author | Posted on: 5 Aug 21

By Charles Ehin for Enlivening Edge Magazine As suggested by Peter Gray1 and other anthropologists our hunter-gatherer ancestors progressively practiced a system of “reverse dominance” that prevented anyone from assuming power over others. This was opposite to the alpha male and female patterns of some of our primate cousins. Regrettably, the introduction of agriculture about 12,000 years ago and with it the accumulation of wealth by some and not others, gradually brought into play what I call “sanctioned dominance.” I propose, we are now finally in a “reverse dominance reclamation phase.” Human nature didn’t actually change when we began to …

Our Evolutionary Quest for We Spaces Read More »

By Charles Ehin for Enlivening Edge Magazine As suggested by Peter Gray1 and other anthropologists our hunter-gatherer ancestors progressively practiced a system of “reverse dominance” that prevented anyone from assuming power over others. This was opposite to the alpha male and female patterns of some of our primate cousins. Regrettably, the introduction of agriculture about 12,000 years ago and with …

Our Evolutionary Quest for We Spaces Read More »


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