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Posts tagged with:  aesthetics

By: The Posts Author | Posted on: 2 Oct 23

Defining characteristics of what may constitute an integral cinematic work are mapped out and developed into a set of evaluation criteria using the works of Dulac, Gebser, and Wilber. A test of these evaluation criteria with the viewing of several motion pictures is summarized; the results suggest that several past and recent films demonstrate qualities that could be said to constitute an integral cinematic work. This post was originally published on Integral Life.

Defining characteristics of what may constitute an integral cinematic work are mapped out and developed into a set of evaluation criteria using the works of Dulac, Gebser, and Wilber. A test of these evaluation criteria with the viewing of several motion pictures is summarized; the results suggest that several past and recent films demonstrate qualities that could be said to


By: The Posts Author | Posted on: 1 Mar 23

“Beauty is truth, truth beauty,—that is all Ye know on earth, and all ye need to know.” —John Keats, “Ode on a Grecian Urn” (1819) In recent decades, empirical studies… View Post The post Beauty Is Truth, Truth Beauty: Aesthetics and the Perception of Accuracy appeared first on Areo.

“Beauty is truth, truth beauty,—that is all Ye know on earth, and all ye need to know.” —John Keats, “Ode on a Grecian Urn” (1819) In recent decades, empirical studies… View Post The post Beauty Is Truth, Truth Beauty: Aesthetics and the Perception of Accuracy appeared first on Areo.


By: The Posts Author | Posted on: 21 Jan 20

I noted earlier that Platonic askēsis, as seen in the beholding of the vision of beauty described in the Symposium, is a kind of aesthetic askēsis, which is also capable of transfiguring the self in unique ways. This kind of askēsis figures strongly in the work of Gabriel Trop. Trop positions art as a way of life, as an askēsis “that continually modifies, often imperceptibly, the manifold patterns of being — whether they are perceptual, behavioral, or affective of the person who undertakes it.”[1] Art and aesthetics for Trop exist in a dual sense, both in the mode of existing art objects

I noted earlier that Platonic askēsis, as seen in the beholding of the vision of beauty described in the Symposium, is a kind of aesthetic askēsis, which is also capable of transfiguring the self in unique ways. This kind of askēsis figures strongly in the work of Gabriel Trop. Trop positions art as a way of life, as an askēsis


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